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of the united states. >> last question.
>> you're coming to us from brazil. you haven't been back to the united states since the first stories were published last summer but you've hinted you're going to come back this spring. i want to bring that up because there's been claims in recent gas dais from some government officials they might hold you accountable and might try to prosecute you in some way. let's play the exchange between the chairman of the house intelligence committee mike rogers and the fbi director from earlier this week. >> there have been discussions about selling of access to this material to both newspaper outlets and other places. mr. comey, to the best of your knowledge is fencing stolen material, that is a crime? >> yes, it is. >> and would be selling the access of classified material that is stolen from the united states government, would that be a crime? >> it would be. it's an issue that can be complicated if it involves a news gathering function, but in general fencing or selling stolen property is a crime. >> your blood must boil when you hear that.
of the united states, and was superseding authority there with a responsibility to inform the public because as he said, he could see nobody else would do it. he saw the head of the nsa but also the director of the intelligence -- national intelligence who was quoted lied to congress, and what he is mostly revealed in particular is not that mr. oathper was violating his in the sense of trying to deceive congress, but that he knew that the false statements that they were not collecting data on millions of americans
? >> yes, it is. >> and would selling the access of classified material stome stolen from the united states -- is that a crime? >> it would be. it can be complicated, but fencing or selling stolen property is a crime. >> if i am a news report for fill in the blank and i sell stolen material is that legal because i am a newspaper reporter? >> if you are hawking stolen jewelry it is as a crime. >> if i am hawking stolen
. but the second aspect is what he's talking about, that process has always in the united states been called journalism. you go to media outlets and you report what the public should know. what this is, is nothing less than an attempt to criminalize journalism like all petty tyrant tries to do when reporters and other journalists expose that which they want to hide. i don't think anybody should mistake what this is really about. >> yet every time we talk, every time you're on television, people on twitter call you a traitor. what is that like to hear traitor and hero from other people? >> yeah. you know, i think that it's always the case that if you are
the tremendous creativity achievement as the anglo has jury of the united states because the wonderful stories of pioneering and fortitude infusion, which are very impressive. but we need to show they're just as good for which constitutes that his backside. i feel possibilities have it get an exhausted beard i just wanted to get people to see a little bit more of that history and displays the image of america is going to multiply to see aspects. feedback is quite timely the fact that it's been great in here about latinos in the united states on a daily basis. uni before the show were talking about how businesses are trying to attract a market place in the growing market in the market, bilingual market. it's an interesting title for the book to reappear. >> host: untried >> guest: i came across a jpeg to photograph the web, which said now hiring bilingual speakers. that is an icon of that time. present day gave me a tremendous favor. it was true hispanics had. the impression is true. because he's the bit about america's to the united states today, which is the very start perception you speak of
't an easy partner for the united states and vice versa but we have to work together. we have seen this year why the relationship is sliding down hill but we will continue to work together. and those that say russia doesn't count anymore or isn't important are flat wrong. it has to be a partner even though as i say in my book it is a cranky partnership. >> you made clear there are two kinds of limit. first, structural limits because of different interests, traditions and circumstances. and then there is limits with russia and what are those? >> first on the structural limits i would emphasis we are still living in a cold war type warp and we focus very much on these, if you like, 20th centry issues. the kind of relationship we don't have that we would have to have are a better partnership with a flushed out economic relationship. russia is a raw material exporter. it sells oil and gas and these are nott things we purchase fro russia. this is one-sided in a way. but the limits go back to the fact we see the world differently from the russians. that the russians want to focus on the sovereignt
and a traitor and engaging in treason and endangering the united states. it's really just a very similar pattern. i knew a long time ago when i went into journalism it wasn't the profession to go into if you want to be universally loved. if you do it the right way you're going to make a lot of powerful people and their loyalists unhappy and i'm perfectly okay with that. >> i hope to see you here in new
that the laws be faithfully executed and commission all officers of the united states these are available. double-click away for you. it is exhausting in the detailing why the temporary appointment authority can be exercised. and for pre-existing conditions. the solicitor general rises to the challenge and defeats. he breaks out the yield's, the canaries and contemporary practices of the founding era. the briefs appendix with us -- list the names of judges who are in cross-section and recessed commissions have an band. counting military appointments the numbers go into the thousands. while i strongly support the solicitor general's position, i do have to come forward to say i strongly believe he made a mistake. the mistake was he should have made a preemptive argument. he knows that, right jacob sometimes it works out well. i argue they present a non- reviewable political question to the courts. some questions are committed by the constitution, by the text of the constitution to the exclusive discretion. could it be that the court has a wonderful opportunity to prove its conservative rest
partnership with russia and russia is still, i mean the united states and russia are the two remaining the rear superpowers in between us we cannot really resolve a number of the worlds major problems if we don't work together. we are seeing that now in terms of syria, in terms of iran, in terms of even issues like terrorism and counterterrorism so russia is not always an easy partner for the united states just as the united states is not an easy partner for russia but we have to work together. we are fated to work together and we have seen that this year when there were plenty of reasons why the relationship deteriorated but in the end we are working together and we will continue to work together and those in the u.s. political class who say that russia doesn't count anymore and it's not important, they are flat wrong. it has to be a partner even though as i say in my book it's a -- partnership. >> host: in your book, you make clear that there are two kinds of deals. first what i would call structural deals because of different interests, because of different historical traditions, be
the united states ready much has had a capitalistic free market economy but the fourth factor is not exactly the same thing. that is why we want to include it as different. it's private property rights with titles and deeds and the reason we think those are so important as there are lots of countries in africa that he will have stuff. they have houses. they have cars but they can't prove it. they can't register it with the government in many cases. a guy named hernando desoto had called mr. capital and it did a study of poorer nations and what he found was in egypt just as one example it took 14 years and 150 separate bureaucratic steps to obtain a license to build on desert land. let me underline desert. i went seven years ago my wife and i bought a new house and sold their existing house. we went to a title agency. they had about 1000 documents laid out. initial here, sign here, sacrifice a chicken over here and that we were done. it took one hour for us to sell our property, by new property, one step, 150 steps, 14 years, one hour, one step and desoto's point is if you can't prove you own
states and france are doing together. >> translator: france and the united states stand side by side to make these values prevail. we stand together with the united states to address the threat of the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction and chemical weapons, together to solve the crises faced by the middle east, together to support africa's development, and together to fight global warming and climate change. >> del, here we are in the east room, and in just a few minute's time we expect to see these two presidents. they will have opening remarks, and then be taking questions from the french media con tin gebt and the american media contingent. we talk about the pomp and circumstance, but there are obviously very serious issues to be discussed. they have met in the oval office already. the top of the list has to be syria. the president on the brink of military action in syria with his allies. then the president saying he was going to congress. and some french officials were very upset of that. iran and the sanctions regime there, as negotiations continue over iran's nuclear
by the united states replaced it's general for ineffectiveness and losing the confidence of u.s. and other allies. president obama spoke about the situation in syria before the talks broke down. he was meeting in california with king abdullah of jordan, where there are 6,000 syrian refugees. >> we'll take steps to help the humanitarian situation there. there will be immediate steps we can take to apply more pressure to the assad regime, and we're going to continue to work with all the parties concerned to try to move forward o on the diplomatic inclusion. >> for now there is no diplomatic solution on the horizon. a third round of talks on syria has been promised but no date has been set. >> so where do we go from here? is the u.s. out of options? are the russians ready to bargain? is there hope for the people of syria? joining us now is daniel senior research professor of conflict management at johns hopkins schools of advance international studies. also a scholar at the middle east institute. from new york city michael weiss fellow from the institute of modern russia and columnist. he has
or kills. eric holder says . . . the u.s. had a $5 million bounty on guzman's head. the united states wants to extradite him for crimes he allegedly committed in the united states. he faces charges in new york, chicago, miami and texas. mexico's attorney general has not commented on the possibility of extradition, meanwhile though the head is behind bars tonight, the organization is not out of business, and it is not the only cartel in mexico to supply america's enormous appetite for drugs. for more now on the arrest of joaquin el chapo guzman, we're joined by adam rainy in mexico city. today he was if i recally charged, what are the counts? >> well, really it's one charge, and it's for breaking mexico's drug f trafficking laws. and that's significant. it is showing the u.s. it has registered a charge, but they haven't decided to file many charges against them. we don't know if he is going to lay on a lot of other charges pending against him. if they were do so, that would be a signal that this man is probably not going to be leaving mexico any time soon. >> what has the government had to s
our viewers in the united states and around the world. we're following the growing crisis in ukraine where tensions are rapidly escalating and the president of the united states, president obama is about to walk into the white house briefing room to make a major statement. the ukrainian government is accusing russian black sea forces of trying to seize two airports in crimea and cutting off communications between the russian majority region and the rest of ukraine. russian troops also are set to have surrounded the state television facility, some are calling it, and i'm quoting it now, an armed invasion of the country. all of this coming just six days after the ukrainian president, viktor yanukovych, was driven from the capital following deadly demonstrations against this pro-moscow president. let's go to our senior white house correspondent jim askos sta. explain this for us. >> president obama was supposed to be out here 15 minutes ago so he's running late. he was expected to be at the democratic committee at this hour, wolf, laying out his midterm strategy for his party. instead h
for the united states? >> i think it does. when you look at the conclusions of not having a negative impact in terms of a the environment and it is not going to significantly up crease the carbon emissions and creating 4,000 direct construction jobs and support 42,000 jobs and have a significant increase in terms of economic development here in the united states, we look at this as a complete win. and we are very excited to move forward to the next steps. >> susan, is that what the report is saying it is making a slam dunk case? >> it is not making a slam dunk case for or against it. it is laying out a number of scenarios and on climate change and water impacts and showing that the president has the grounds to reject it. the report is showing that it is driving the expansion and the associated climate impacts that have a strong impact on water if there are spills from it and it is basically a pipeline that is exporting most of the mile. >> it is about the number of jobs created as michael suggested? >> what this pipeline would do is create 35 permanent jobs and construction jobs. we can ge
society at a domestic level, but they also face pressure from the united states to maintain alliance obligations . once in the valleys those governments balance between these two forces in, the domestic and international level. >> host: when you looked at the 700 plus bases around the world that the u.s. has, how many of them are welcome to in these foreign lands? >> guest: the majority of them i would say are actually welcome . you are looking at -- 700 bases. probably more. they just cannot be declared war are secret bases. i would say -- it is hard to say whether they are welcome, but the host government accepts them. i would say at least 75%, they are not contested. the majority of bases are in places like germany or mainland japan, but the few that have been contested seem to cause lots of problems for u.s. diplomats or the u.s. military because we see those as hypocritical. >> host: such as where? >> guest: and okinawa, there has been a long-running feud in okinawa where the open now once have been upset about a specific base. in 1995 there was a horrible rate case or a school
in the united states and fast-forward i finished high school and so on and so forth and i do work for the united nations now ambassador and also to go underground. and negotiate a lease with the staff and this is very difficult work and i am married and i'm expecting a child. and i've been very fortunate with my life and of course i will continue to write and so thank you for coming and thank you for the wonderful questions and i do hope that you read the book tomorrow and i will be very interested in the reactions and finer selves with these reduced characters. and i thank you to the store for having us and they are the ones that make this possibility and pass it on. and so we will continue to do it. so thank you again. [applause] [applause] >> well, let's keep it going. >> just a quick refresher on the wine rules. once you approach the wine you have your ticket in hand would to god that he purchased a copy in this ticket enables you to get online and you can meet our glorious leader and have whatever you want signed. >> booktv is on facebook. like us and get up-to-date on information and event
himself is gauging in state-sanctioned terror against his own people. >> it was the united states and russia that brought the warring parties and syria to the negotiating table in the first place but secretary kerry had harsh words for russia monday saying its military support for the assad regime has enabled assad to double down which is creating an enormous problem. alid almoalem said it created a negative atmosphere for the talks. >> we are saying that the way the regime is negotiating is negative for the talks. this is a conflict now that the negotiations aren't going in any direction. >> more than 140,000 syrians have died since the beginning of the war, according to the london-based association of syrian rights. 7,000 were children. with the bleak humanitarian situation the u.n. emergency relief agency was able to evacuate over a thousand people from the ancient city of homs, after 18 months of fighting that's ruined the old city, a feeble cease fire allowed peace keepers to physically guide out of the city, women, children, and disabled residents caught in the middle of the
states wants to extradite him for the crimes in the united states. he faces a number of drugs and money landering charges in new york, chicago, miami and texas. they have not commented about the idea of extradition and the head of the cartel is behind bars tonight. the organization is not out of business. . it is not the only cartel operating in mexico to supply the americans the drugs. for more now on the arrest of guzman, we are joined by al jazeera adam from mexico city and thank you for joining us on "inside story" and today guzman is officially charged and what are the counts? >> well, really, it is one charge, and it is for breaking the mexican drug trafficking laws and that is significant and showing the u.s. they are registering a charge, but they haven't started to file many of the charges against him. so we don't know yet if the government and their president is going to lay on a lot of other charges that are pending against him. if they did so, that is signalling that this man is not leaving mexico with the blessing of the government any time soon. >> what did the government
was a little bit but still ok i am originally from the united states. this tidy when two of my undergraduate college was university of arkansas folk which is where i grew up. i then went to yale team of work for the federal government for lil bit and then worked for several colleges in the us could until i came here ok and distribute into town one in the year and two thousand and ten in the fall of two thousand and ten pesos over two years he has to be taught what guests and the neo this is not usual that we see you younger generation of american scholars income on building a tenured position now also at the very prestigious national university in taiwan. why don't you wanna come to taiwan. oh well. ncc you provided me the opportunity to come and visit here is a visitor passes here. well that really was very good for me and and i'm very grateful for is the dean of the college in the chair of the department of diplomacy for being the good and. but then that turned into essentially a permanent position than i was very happy about that because my wife is here and sell that that makes things muc
should be in the conflict with the majority of you saying the united states should say out. you can share your thoughts, join in on the conversation at facebook.com/c-span. looking at our scheduled in primetime tonight, starting at 8:00 p.m. eastern, the u.s. editor in chief for "the guardian" newspaper talks about how they broke the story about former nsa contractor edward snowden. she is part of a panel organized as part of a year-long project entitled "journalism after snowden." 8:00 p.m. eastern. tonight, we will talk with two u.s. senators. senator heidi hyde can talks about how her name went from mary margaret to heidi. >> i grew up in a small catholic community, and when i was growing up, the two classes, whether it was first and second or third and forth, they were into classrooms, and there was a small group of girls. there was a lot of marys. there was mary beth, mary jo, mary catherine. my parents never called me mary. my name was cathy. i best friends name was cathy. she decided in the third grade that she would rename me. she was a voracious reader and had already read hundre
. they will look at how this pipeline impacts the relationship between canada and the united states. it's energy security issues. there are a lot of issues they are going to look into, it is not done yet. the state department, and other agencies will continue their review. they said today that john kerry has not read the review yet, or made a determination. everyone expects both environmentalists and supporters of this project say this will come down whether barack obama will approve this like the canadian government and many congressional republicans want to see, or support his environmentalists on his side. >> today is not only marking the last day that ben bernanke is the head of the federal reserve, and also marks the chinese new year of the horse. i'm wondering if there's any commentary about what is going on in china, particularly at a time when the president did not mention anything about the debt in the state of the union? >> there were a number of foreign policy areas that he did not get into. some believe that he did not get into the areas where he did not want to inflame things, and w
. the battle for ukraine underlies the tension between russia and the united states of late. some believe it harkens back to the cold war. i'm joined now by the president's national security adviser susan rice. welcome back to "meet the press." >> good to be with you, david. >> ambassador, what is the latest? where is yanukovych? are you worried this is a situation teetering towards civil wars? >> david, yanukovych's whereabouts, as you said, are not own at the present. what we do know he picked up in a very orderly fashion and left the capital kiev just after having signed an agreement that was designed to lead to a unity government. from the u.s. point of view, our interests have been clear all along. we want to see a de-escalation of the violence. we want to see constitutional change. we want to see democratic elections in very short order, and the opportunity for the people of ukraine to come together in a coalition unity. that's happening. >> is the united states on the side of the protests? >> the united states is on the side of the ukrainian people. they have indicated three months
of petroleum trapped in the tar sands of canada. canada wants to send it south through the united states by pipeline to the u.s. coast. the obama administration moved slowly in either killing or approving the project as it pits environmentalists against the big close trading partner. there's no making everyone happy. you either build the pipeline and ship the oil through it, or you don't. somebody is not going to get what they want. the president kicked the decision to the state department. state commissioned a new report. decision time is getting closer. >> most americans don't know the united states gets most of its imported oil from canada. thanks to new technologies canada churned out oil in amounts unimaginable and for this the u.s. is seeking a new way to get that oil to this market. thus, the keystone xl pipeline plan, a project bringing oil and jobs to the u.s. in significant quantities. because the project crosses an international border the state department was required to produce an environmental impact report that came last week. in the long-awaited report it opened the door
break, but when we come back we'll take a closer look at the "who said so" problem. is the united states in the right position to be looking across the world in naming and shaming? and does it any good? does it change the practices of those governments named in that report. this is "inside story." stay with us. welcome back to inside story. >> welcome back to inside story. i'm ray suarez on. edition of our program we're talking about the human rights report card released by the secretary of state today. this is not some high-minded exercise. this is about accountability. but sanjeev. naturally one country that is not reported on is the united states itself. does it undermine the united states own authority in this regard. >> at a technical level i don't think th they are allowed to doy report because it's ministry of affairs. but surveillance, the nsa, the crackdown on edward snowden is another example when it comes to freedom at home and the ability of wrestl whistle blowers. and then broader economic issues, police brutality and the use of death penalty. these are human rights at home
be a very bad scenario for the national security of the united states and israel if nations throughout the mideast turned to enriching uranium? >> yes. particularly for other peaceful purposes, obviously. >> well, the disappoint do you think the iranians are trying to build bomb before we got involved? >> they approached from a threshold capability. the delivery capability but for them the uranium is -- they certainly have the expertise down. they so chose. they have the expertise if they so chose. how long would it take? >> it depends on a lot of factors best discussed in closed session. >> thank you, senator graham. >> we appreciate your testimony, your service and join in a number of for their service and the families of the support all of you. we will stand adjourned. someone will be in touch about a closed meeting. >> yes, sir. [inaudible conversations] wednesday morning. you're watching c-span2 with politics and public affairs weekdays. french president visited the white house today the first visit from the french head of state since 1996. president obama greeted the president in
the united states air force and navy than the united states army. what distinguishes it from the relatively affluent media? technology gives you a greater advantage. you typically have a small number of targets that you can identify and engage and established the domains. what is different is incident a bounded number of targets, on land you have tens of thousands of targets, all of which are trying to be classified as such. you can recognize counter measures that are land-based. there are two ways to fight the united states military brother. what is important is for us to d joint forcee to jewel war capability. that is what combined arms capability is. our enemies will take action to avoid our strengths. there's never been a silver bullets. there are always countermeasures developed. he talked about some that are developing now. we had on our strength capability. that is under threat by not just traditional countermeasures that increasingly technological. for us to have an effective capability to prevent and when as the nation, we need a balance joint force. when power is an essential comp
? >> this is a significant victory for both mexico and the united states. this is the world's most notorious drug lord that got taken down. he's really the godfather, if you will, of the cartels that has smuggled so many drugs into the united states, killed so many people in mexico and around the world. and to bring him to justice, finally, after so many decades, is a great victory. and i do to want take a chance to applaud the i.c.e. agents, the dea agents that worked this case and the mexican authorities that stepped up to the plate and showed great cooperation with the united states to make this happen. this is a huge event. it's sort of like, you know, again, the godfather, the al capone of chicago. in chicago, he's the number one enemy. it would be similar to pablo escobar in colombia being taken down, after which the drug cartels began to unravel. >> given what you've said, chairman, the mexican ambassador to the u.s. said that he thinks it's important that guzman first be tried in mexico. would you like to see him extradited to the united states? >> i would. i think the normal sequence is the m
, two things. that hollande should draw lessons and see the way of the economy of the united states is really getting better with gross ra -- growth rate of 2.8 and unemployment coming down. in france everything goes up. unemployment rate is far more than 10%, growth rate is about 0.9, which means that rate of unemployment will still go up. we have never of that heard of. so french people thinks maybe he should follow obama, who is having a better economy, shaping up in a better way right now. >> christian, the issue of hollande's personal life be as much of a factor for him if the economy were better in france right now? >> yes, definitely. the thing which is positive, definitely, between united states and france is we can rely upon the military help, logistical help of the united states as we could see and great britain, too, in the region when we have to fight in north africa, in mali, central africa today. we are all working together. but i think it's great that we are all together fighting against terrorism but at the same time when i read this tribute written by president obam
the united states and russia. you know, ed, one of the things that have been discussed throughout this entire incident and issue in ukraine is what is the state of the relationship between the united states and russia? u.s. officials have been very adamant that this is not a return to the cold war. and yet, when you see something like this happening, if russia has, in fact, invaded ukraine at this point it will undoubtedly just continue to create a larger gulf between the two nations. so, that is the backdrop to the president coming out to the brady press briefing room momentarily. we expect him to come out at any minute now and again, i anticipate that he will have very stern words for russia. the question is will he draw a red line? if so, what will the consequences be? those are some of the things that i will be listening quite closely for and it's also worth noting, ed, that the former president of ukraine, as you pointed out, viktor yanukovych, he has not been deposed, still the leader of that country. many within ukraine don't see it that way. so the situation continues to be volatile t
joined to stave off russian encroachments in the crimea into the middle east so to give the united states a century later labor to prevent soviet encroachments in the middle east. but the alliance in the middle east cold war were never completely and fully drawn. on one level there were the pro-american mostly traditional monarchies versus the radical states of egypt iraq syria algeria yemen and libya that at any given time the monarchies were also loggerheads. sometimes the saudis were at blogger -- loggerheads with the -- the arab-israeli conflict also cut across these lines. so in theory it was a proxy war between the united states and the soviet union the united states supporting israel in the soviet union supporting the arab side at different points it pitted a pro-american israel nurses are pro-american jordan and a pro-american saudi arabia so the lights were never completely drawn. again it was the arab-israeli war of 1973 that enabled secretary of state henry kissinger with singular vision and drive to lay the foundations of a weekend today call in retrospect the pax americana. t
position or place in intelligence in the united states of america. most recently as the communications director of the national geospatial intelligence agency. they manage the 16 satellites that guide our navigation systems in the united states. it's quite remarkable. they have 16,000 employees to do that. i think they were doing something else. what do you think? anyway, now he has the role of being chairman of the public utilities regulatory -- what's the last word? authority. [laughter] that's not how i want to introduce him. he has a lot of skills outside of all of this incredibly serious and important and incredibly intelligent view of the world. he does marvelous imitations and i'm going to ask you to do one. he has an incredible knowledge of languages. i was doing a talk to 300 or 400 people from africa and arthur helped me. i do a lot of business in africa and he had spent a lot of time in the congo, or zaire. they came up and said you got it right. and arthur would say, where are you from? he said he was from coat dove while --the ivory coast. then someone from togo would come
commissioned a new report. decision time is getting closer. >> most americans don't know the united states gets most of its imported oil from canada. thanks to new technologies canada churned out oil in amounts unimaginable and for this the u.s. is seeking a new way to get that oil to this market. thus, the keystone xl pipeline plan, a project bringing oil and jobs to the u.s. in significant quantities. because the project crosses an international border the state department was required to produce an environmental impact report that came last week. in the long-awaited report it opened the door for building the pipeline. with or without the pipeline extension, canada's oil will find a way to get to market - if not by pipeline, by railway. either way the carbon footprint is significant, and that has environmentalists in revolt. it leaves the president with a difficult decision. we welcome the u.s. state department report and encourage that it concludes that keystone xl would not have a significant environmental impact. >> the keystone pipeline extension will transport nearly a million barrels of
, due to steps made by the united states, the united states of america trusts innovation, energy, it also benefits from low-costs of energy, and bold decisions. this economic recovery is an opportunity for europe, but it also is an example to be followed, of reference, that should encourage us to promote competitivety through the necessary means, but also to promote innovation and new energy, and that is precisely the meaning of my visit to the silicon valley tomorrow. finally, we agreed with our american friends to sign a partnership agreement between europe and the united states, with the best intentions, to open markets, to remove, monitor ris -- non-terrorist barriers, and make proposals and tender for markets. of course each country has its own position. we all know what mandate was given to the european commission. we all know how concerned we were when it came to farming, agriculture, or cultural product, but we really want to reach this agreement, because this agreement will contribute to growth, developing world trade in an balanced manner is a precious contributing fact
to be reformed the united states, and australia is going through a major copyright review, and we're trying to set in a stone of like of these cowhich right provisions that are clearly in flux. and many of those trade advisory committees want it to remain secret. >> joshua i'm not sure that secrecy in in and of itself is the rub here, because most free trade agreements are done primarily behind closed doors. i think what is really getting people's attention is the number of industry lobbyists who had access. do you have any reason why? >> i think that's being played out in the sense that there are definitely trade advisory committees who have access to the negotiations, but they are not actually lobbyists. the administration has been very clear that lobbyists aren't going to have access. a lot of them are corporate, because a lot of this has to do with trade, which at the end of the day is being conducted by companies who have a particular interest and expertise in how that works. so i think it needs to be understanding that there is an expertise that you would want the government to listen
in his face in france and coming to the united states, the french public regard fltion their own domestic political situation, obama is pretty popular there. if you want to make references back it to old europe and donald rumsfeld complaining in the post-9/11 years about how france and germany would not support american military adventurism, obama has ended that. obama in the last five years got the united states out of iraq. the french are happy about that. it's a safe bet for hollande domestically to come to washington and be seen as close to this intellectually, ground breaking, forward thinking american president. the extent to which it trumps germany's relationship with the united states, i don't think so. . >> i think that was not well received by merkel to put it mildly. she is the leader of that whole constituency in europe. i don't think she was very happy about that. i also don't think she was very happy about the obama administration and she has not been for quite a qiel. where as hollande who has unique problems in france at this stage, had this was a perfect escape for him. i
>> the first olympic ice dance gold medallists every from the united states. >> we came, we saw, we conquered. >> two members of the punk band pussy riot have been taken into custody. >> the man who ended america's 62 year medal drought. >> the russians have affirmed they're going the help out assad in syria. >> russian relations with syria. >> nothing is going change in this particular picture without russians deciding if it is in their best interests. >>> back in the former ussr, in the biggest political disruption of the olympic games so far two members of the band pussy riot were detained for hours today but russian police in -- to underscore just how controversial this band has become, this was their third arrest since arriving in sochi on sunday night. this time russian law officials alleged that the band members had stolen from their hotel. they accused of us a criminal offense, one band member told reporters. she explained they were out walking when police rounded them up into a paddy wagon. the duo say they were subjected to abuses during the interrogation including having
skeptical about gun-control but the fact of the matter is there are 300,000 in the united states. and i am doubtful any law that congress can pass could do much about gun violence. >> host: 300,000 laws? >> guest: i am sorry 300,000 guns. >> host: 300 million. >> guest: thank you. treated million guns in the united states. i understand that is controversial and and like to talk about that i am not sure i am right but the way to not talk about it is to talk about the second amendment as an issue start to talk about the second amendment to very bad things happen. the first, the discussion is sidetracked that could do not be more irrelevant instead of talking about whether the laws will control gun violence or even if it is an aspect of the natural right instead of that we start to talk about the relationship between the introductory clause and what exactly was the militias 200 years ago and what is the relationship and our constitution and the english bill of rights? it has nothing to do with the question it is hard to imagine anyone with take seriously the proposition we should decide what
in american politics about different aspects of power in the united states, a power of the president is those are the class's that i teach. >> host: why don't speaker is vote on legislation? at. >> guest: traditionally it is of legacy of the hybrid position. as a partisan leader paul savas non-partisan if you are non-partisan it means you're not supposed to take part in the issues of the day that puts you on one side or the other. to the extent it can preside over the house people might question their ability to do that so traditional breed they do not but they are not prohibited. but traditionally they do not. but this has not changed over time in the '70s they started to participate more often. gingrich voted quite a bit. so boehner has moved back a little bit he votes very, very very rarely of the house floor as a reflection of his belief the speaker needs to move himself out of the debates and conflict in order to see in -- you had the whole interest of the whole house apart. >> host: we have been talking toots teeeighteen about his book "the speaker of the house" a study of leadership" p
was a special importance to the united states. unbeknownst to him, the agent had been compromised by the chinese. as their plane came in on a secret location for a landing, it was shot down and the two pilots were killed. they spent 20 years in a chinese prison. until thened there early 1970's. we have our heroes. connecticut has those yale graduates famous for the cold war when in just after world war inand played a very crucial the central intelligence agency. most people are heroes we never hear about. i have a friend here today whose nephew was injured in the bombing in afghanistan where the cia officers were killed. and that isuietly what intelligence work is often about. most people in intelligence are just less well known. they have private, less dangerous lives. they do things like economic analysis or photo interpretation or the intercept conversations. kindare the backbone -- i of think they should be recognized in the same way that we recognize our military or police officers or first responders or firefighters. they are public servants. the work that they do should be celebrated. we
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